Thursday, December 16, 2010

fresh Turkey options at Byerly's

Thinking back to Thanksgiving, I sure enjoyed turkey for the holiday meal and turkey leftovers in the following days. I think we should cook another turkey.... What do you think? See other "food for thought" here.



11 comments:

  1. Turkey's always a good stand-by. Lund's cooked our Thanksgiving dinner and although I no longer have a good excuse to forego cooking Christmas dinner, I may give the market another order. Only two choices, tho: turkey or prime rib. Since the prime rib is a little pricey, I need to think about it. Ham doesn't do it for our family so...and what's your decision; have you decided yet.

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  2. This picture would have been hilarious if these were sitting out in the woods. Because the photo was so small on Facebook when I first glanced that's what I thought I was seeing!

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  3. We will have a "Danish Duck" (or 2) for Christmasdinner - which is the 24th.

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  4. Another turkey would be most welcome!

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  5. You can never have too much turkey.
    I wish we could get whole ones in Israel.
    Send me the wishbone. :)

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  6. Found this, while wondering about the origins of the Christmas turkey:
    The tradition of eating turkey only at Christmas is a distant memory of the days when the principal dish on that day was something special. Before turkey took over, the popular Christmas delicacies were bustard, goose and cockerel, and in the houses of the rich, peacock and swan. The peacock was often skinned before roasting. For serving, it was re-clothed in its feathers and its beak was gilded. Sometimes the beak was propped open with a bit of bread soaked in spirit. This would then be set alight and the bird brought into the dining hall with the greatest pomp and ceremony.

    The turkey was introduced into Europe by one of Sebastian Cabot's officers on a return journey from the New World, which is where the birds came from. Strangely, they were called turkeys because of their similarity with another bird which was already established in England for human consumption. This was known as the turkey! Merchants from the Levant, or Turkey, first brought them to England, having originally imported them from West Africa. This soon created a lot of confusion. So, the first turkey was renamed the Guinea Fowl, as a reminder of its place of origin.
    Thank you for participating at our new meme, and sharing our passion for good food!

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  7. Pork Roast is my favorite but I would not turn down a turkey dinner.

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  8. Oi, they used to eat peacocks and swans??

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  9. Your Thanksgiving is in a way more "serious" than X-mas, if I have understood my big brother correct; living many years in USA!
    I don't think a turkey could be prepared in my danish oven, the bird would be all to big :-D

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  10. How many of those turkeys are from Congress?

    The inquiring mind of «Louis la Vache» wants to know...

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  11. Was macht Ihr in den USA an Christmas Dinner?
    Bei uns in Germany gibt es Gans oder Pute.

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